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Vol. X, No. 1 


April, 1921 


The Bulletin 

of the 

Associate Alumnae of 
Barnard College 


PUBLISHED BY 

The Associate Alumnae 


FELLOW ALUMNAE: 




reeling! 


•a* The Publicity Committee places be- 
fore you this little pamphlet. It has several new 
features: pictures, advertisements, letters on policy, 
etc. Show your interest by writing the Executive 
Secretary whether you like it or not. Please 

criticise, please suggest. Above all, please express 
your opinion on the advisability of a more frequent 
publication. Reports of 1919-1920, read at the Octo- 
ber meeting are rather stale by April 1921. As a 
medium for exchange of views, for the up-building 
of policy, a publication appearing once a year cannot 
serve the ever-increasing interests of the Associate 
Alumnae. ^ If you want to see the BARNARD 
ALUMNAE QUARTERLY on your library table 
wake up and say so, send in ideas and personals for 
publication and get those friends of yours to pay 
their dues so your contributions may appear! 


Tiffany & Co. 


Jewelry and Silverware 

A STOCK UNIQUE IN 

Scope, Quality and Value 


Purchases may be made by Mail 


Fifth Avenue & 37 -Street 
New York. 









V. Vv 




\ -- - 





















THE BULLETIN 


Of the Associate Alumnae 


Vol. X APRIL, 1921 No. 1 


OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
1920-21 


President Ruth Guernsey, ’14 

Vice-President and Chairman of 

Finance Committee Sarah Butler, ’IS 

Vice-President and Chairman of 

Reunion Committee ....Hilda Newborg Strauss (Mrs. Israel), '00 

Secretary Elsie Plaut Kahn (Mrs. Ely), '10 

Treasurer Myra McLean, ’09 

Mabel Parsons, ’95 
Eleanor Osborne, ’98 

Marjorie Jacobi McAneny (Mrs. George), ’99 

Ellinor Reiley Endicott (Mrs. George), ’00 

Harriet Burton Laidlaw (Mrs. James Lees), ’01 

Eleanor Gay Van de Water (Mrs. Frederick Jr.), ’09 

Pamela Poor, ’12 

Priscilla Lockwood, ’13 

Edith Mulhall Achilles (Mrs. Paul S.), T4 

Katherine McGiffert Wright (Mrs. John K. ), ’16 

Estelle O’Brien, ’16 

Gertrude Geer, ’19 

Alumnae Trustee Sara Straus Hess (Mrs. Alfred F.), ’00 


OTHER OFFICERS 

Assistant Treasurer and Chairman of 

Membership Committee Theodora Baldwin, ’00 

Clerk Elsa Mehler, T2 

Executive Secretary Anna Reiley, ’05 


ALUMNAE COUNCIL 

Chairman Ellinor Reiley Endicott (Mrs. George), ’00 

Virginia Newcomb, ’00 

Elizabeth Roberts Compton (Mrs. Alfred), ’01 
Caroline B’ombacher Stacey (Mrs. Sidney G. ), ’95 
Helen St. Clair Mullan (Mrs. George V.), ’98 
Mary Hall Bates (Mrs. John E. ), ’02 

Sara Straus Hess (Mrs. Alfred F.), ’00, ex-officio Alumnae Trustee 

Ruth Guernsey, ex-officio President 


I 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 


First Vice-President, Chairman 
Treasurer 

Katherine McGiffert Wright (Mrs. John K.), '16 

MEMBERSHIP AND STATISTICS COMMITTEE 

Assistant Treasurer, Chairman 
Dorothy Blondel, T6 
Dorothy Pratt, ’ll 
Mildred Blout, T8 
Amy Jennings, ’20 

Anna Reiley, '05, Executive Secretary, ex-officio 
Anna E. H. Meyer, ’98, Registrar of the 
College, ex-officio 

Katherine S. Doty, ’04, Secretary of the 
College, ex-officio 

STUDENTS AID COMMITTEE 

Mabel Parsons, ’95, Chairman 
Sara Straus Hess (Mrs. Alfred F\), ’00 
Mary Nammack Boyle (Mrs. John N.), TO 
Caroline Rromhacber Stacey (Mrs. Sidney G.), ’95 
Margaret Giddings, T8 

REUNION COMMITTEE 

Second Vice-President, Chairman 
Helen Stevens, T8 

Carol Lorenz Hier (Mrs. Frederick), '16 
Pamela Poor, T2 

Agnes Denike Murray (Mrs. Joseph), ’ll 
Elsa Mchler, T2 
Marion Travis, ’20 

EMPLOYMENT COMMITTEE 

Agnes L. Dickson, '99, Chairman 
Eva S. Potter, ’96 

Alma Wallach Liebman (Mrs. Alfred), ’01 

Julia S. Haskell (Mrs. H. S.) , ’04 

Georgina Stickland Gates (Mrs. Arthur I.), T7 

BY-LAWS AND LEGISLATION COMMITTEE 

Edith Striker, ’99, Chairman 

Irma Heiden Kaufmann (Mrs. Fritz), ’ll 

Margaret Yates, ’08 

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 

Sophie P. Woodman, ’07, Chairman 
Edith Dietz, ’05 
Mildred Blout, T8 
Margaret Meyer, T5 
Annie Van Buskirk, ’ll 


2 


NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Adaline Wheelock, ’97, Chairman 

Mary Nammack Boyle (Mrs. John N.), TO 

Mary Budds, ’08 

Clara Applegate Thomas (Mrs. E. E.), '04 
Rita Hilborn, T3 

Madeleine Hirsh Ottenberg (Mrs. I. S.), ’ll 
Isabel Totten, T5 
Margaret Herod, ’20 

JOHN JAY ALUMNAE COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL 
ACTIVITIES 

Mabel Parsons, ’95, Chairman 
Sara Straus Hess (Mrs. Alfred F.), ’00 
Marion Tyndall, ’20 
Agnes Piel, '20 

Florence de L. Lowther (Mrs. F. de L.), T2 

BROOKS HALL ALUMNAE COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL 
ACTIVITIES 

Mabel Parsons, ’95, Chairman 
Sara Straus Hess (Mrs. Alfred F.), ’00 
Marion Tyndall, ’20 
Agnes Piel, ’20 

Florence de L. Lowther (Mrs. F. de L.), T2 
Lilian Egleston, TO 

Eleanor Gay Van de Water (Mrs. Frederick Jr.), ’09 

ALUMNAE COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL ACTIVITIES OF 
STUDENTS LIVING OFF THE CAMPUS 

Florence Read Miles (Mrs. Dudley H.), TO, Chairman 
Amy Jennings, ’20 
Pamela Thomas, T9 
Vivian Tappen, T9 

Edna Stitt Robinson (Mrs. Millard), ’06 
Phebe Hoffman Keyes (Mrs. George), T2 
Margery Egleston, TO 1 

Elsie Plant Kahn (Mrs. Ely), TO 

ALUMNAE DAY COMMITTEE 

Dorothy Herod, T4, Chairman 
Isabel Totten, T5 
Adele Alfke, T9 

BARNARD REPRESENTATIVE ON COMMITTEE TO 
ASSIST NEW YORK COLLEGE SETTLEMENT 
Adaline Wheelock, ’97 

BARNARD REPRESENTATIVE ON THE A. C. A. COMMITTEE 
FOR THE WASHINGTON CLUB HOUSE 
Sarah S. Butler, T5 

A. C. A. COUNCILLOR 
Eleanor Osborne, ’98 


3 


WHAT IS YOUR OPINION? 


As president of the Associate Alumnae of Barnard College 
I wish to call the attention of the alumnae to the following 
letters on a vital question, one that the association must soon 
decide and which is now under consideration by the Alumnae 
Council. There is no question that whatever concerns the 
welfare of the undergraduate and the college, as well as the 
general field of higher education, is admittedly within the 
scope of the activities of the association. The question is 
whether the association shall concern itself with outside ac- 
tivities in other fields, such as welfare work and social service. 
Expressions of opinion from those interested will be heartily 
welcomed, and may be sent to the editor of the Alumnae 
Bulletin for publication or to the chairman of the Alumnae 
Council. 

Ruth E. Guernsey. 

March, 1921. 

To the Editor of the Bulletin : 

Dear Madame : — In these times when Reconstruction is the 
watchword and everyone is on the alert for constructive 
changes, the question as to the function of the alumnae body of 
the college is very much in the foreground. 

I think before one can discuss this question, one must realize 
thoroughly that a successful college to-day cannot abstract 
itself from its surroundings — set itself apart, so to speak, as 
a definite unrelated concrete fact. We must admit its relation 
to the living organism of which it is an integral part. It 
throws out its tentacles into the community which in turn 
leaves its stamp on the student body and on the teaching staff. 

Shall the alumnae then, the mature and finished product of 
the college, take no part in this constant ebb and flow? Shall 
it limit its usefulness to the narrow field of college activities. 
Ought we not as a body, take a greater share in community life? 
I should like to state, right here, that the passive attitude of 
the alumnae was one of the reasons that our endowment drive 
last year did not meet with more spontaneous support. I do 
not mean passive attitude on the part of the alumnae toward 
the college, alone, but even more the passive attitude of the 
alumnae to the communitv interests. 

We must of course limit our activities, but we can take part 
in the vital movements, and I feel that Barnard College, be- 
cause of its strategical position in the heart of a big city, has 
a problem and an opportunity peculiar to itself. We cannot 
help being influenced by external events — we ought not neglect 
our chance to influence our environment. 

Hilda N. Strauss. 


4 



“THERE IS A COLLEGE ON BROADWAY” 
BARNARD FROM STUDENTS HALL 









































March 12, 1921. 


To the Editor of the Bulletin : 

The question is often asked “What activities should the 
alumnae association undertake ?” Should we devote our efforts 
to the interests of Barnard or should we go outside to other 
fields, too? There is a difference of opinion in the answers. 
I wish to state a few reasons why. I believe it is best for the 
Associate Alumnae of Barnard College to devote its energy 
to the interests of Banard College activities in particular, and 
to college activities in general. 

The bond which binds Barnard women together is Barnard. 
I doubt if any other bond could be found which is common to 
us all and not enjoyed by any other group. The basis of our 
organization is that we were graduated from Barnard College. 
Suppose we were to undertake some non-Barnard work, would 
we be able to keep the interest of all the Barnard women? 
Would we be serving Barnard’s best interests if we entered 
into some non-Barnard field which offended other Barnard 
alumnae and kept them from returning to college or partici- 
pating in our association? I believe that we should not be 
serving Barnard in the best way possible if we decreased the 
support of any of its alumnae. It is sometimes said that 
Barnard is different — it is situated in a city. The college is 
in New York City, but the members of the Associate Alumnae 
are living in China, India, France, England, Japan, California, 
Texas, etc. Their dues support our association. Why should 
we spend them on anything but Barnard business? It is true 
that our association is often asked to join with other clubs in 
New York City in raising funds for X Y Z or endorsing 
Law M or N, putting ourselves on record as opposed to Law 
P or 0 . The other groups of college alumnae in the city 
which are often called upon are the Vassar Club of New York, 
the New York Bryn Mawr Club, the Smith College Club of 
New York,- — these local clubs are not to be confused with the 
alumnae associations of Vassar, Bryn Mawr and Smith. We 
have no New York City Barnard Club and so the appeals to 
Barnard women are made through our alumnae association. 
The members of the Vassar Club of New York have two bonds 
in common — the members are alumnae of Vassar and they live 
in New York. The Associate Alumnae of Barnard College 
has this bond — its members are alumnae of Barnard. 

My second point is that there are many college interests to 
which the Associate Alumnae of Barnard College should devote 
its energy. Not only have we the intimate problems with 
Barnard undergraduates, faculty and trustees, but we should 
appreciate our relationship to other college groups. We should 
take up work and keep our alumnae informed of the work with 
the International Federation of University women, Association 


7 


of Collegiate Alumnae, Association of Alumnae Secretaries, 
and similar organizations. At present I venture to say that 
few Barnard women know very much about these organiza- 
tions of which Barnard College alumnae are a part. We should 
publish a quarterly instead of an annual or semi-annual bulletin 
through which we could keep our alumnae better acquainted 
with Barnard and the college world. 

In closing I wish to add that I believe it broader for Barnard 
women to take up non-Barnard activities through other or- 
ganizations than the Associate Alumnae. We should join 
with women from other colleges and with non-collegiate 
women, and often with men, when we work for non-Barnard 
programs. We should be narrow if we claimed all Barnard 
women should work only together. Let Barnard women join 
other groups and let their influence for the good be felt in 
every community ! Let Barnard women unite in the A. A. 
of B. C. for the interests of Barnard ! 

Sincerely yours, 

Edith Mulhall Achilles. 

NOTICE OF TEAS 

The alumnae are cordially and earnestly invited to the college 
teas held every Wednesday afternoon from four to six in the 
College Parlor, Students Hall. 

THE ALUMNAE OFFICE 

The alumnae office, Room 105. Students Hall is now open 
from nine to five on week days, until one on Saturdays and 
until 10 P.M. on Tuesday evenings. The telephone number 
is Morningside 1400, exchange 417 and the executive secre- 
tary. Anna Reilev ' 05 , is always glad to have the alumnae call 
on the telephone or drop in to discuss the many aspects of the 
work of the association. 

CLASSES ARE ASKED TO SUGGEST NAMES TO 
NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

The Nominating Committee has felt for some time the need 
of closer cooperation between the class organizations and the 
Associate Alumnae. In order to further this cooperation a letter 
has been written to each class secretary asking that the Exec- 
utive Committee of the class send suggestions to the nominat- 
ing committee for nominations for the next Board of Directors. 
The names suggested by the different classes will be filed and 
considered not only for nominations for the Board of Directors, 


8 


but for the different vacancies to be filled in the committees 
next year. 

Furthermore the committee hopes that the independent nom- 
inations, so successfully employed last spring, will be continued 
this year. By means of this practice the association can have 
the benefit of a larger number of nominees than can be named 
by the nominating committee which is limited, by the By-Laws 
to twenty-five. 1 ■' 

Adaline C. Wheelock, Chairman. 

ARE YOU PROUD OF YOUR CLASS? 

M embership in 



President 

Secretary 

Association 

’93 

* 

* 

100 Jo 

’94 

* 

, . . Eliza Jones 

75% 

’95 

Mrs. S. G. Stacey 

. . Mabel Parsons 

100% 

’96 

Mrs. Wm. R. Arnold 

. . Mary M. Stone 

82% 

’9 7 

Mrs. Edwin Van Riper.... 

. . Grace Fenton 

67% 

’98 

Anna Meyer 

. . . Susan Mvers 

63% 

’99 

Virginia Gildersleeve . . . . 

...Elsie Kupfer 

90% 

’00 

Mrs. George Endicott 

...Mrs. E. J. West ...... 

59% 

’01 

Pauline Dederer 

...Mrs. Jacob Noeggerath 

72% 

’02 

Mrs. George Close 

...Mrs. W. H. McCastline 

.... 50% 

’03 

Jean Miller 

...Mrs. Herbert Richards 

56% 

’04 

Charlotte Morgan 

. . . Florence Beeckman . . . 

51% 

’05 

Laura Parker 

. ..Sallie Fletcher 

51% 

’06 

Mrs. Ralph Stoddard 

. . . Elizabeth Post 

48% 

’07 

Louise Odencrantz 

. . . Florence Gordon 

51% 

’08 

Mrs. Wayland Dorrance . 

. . . Mary Budds 

49% 

’09 

Adelaide Richardson . . . . 

...Josephine O’Brien .... 

55% 

’10 

Mrs. Dudley H. Miles 

...Mrs. Bernard Stebbins 

45% 

’ll 

Vera Fueslein 

. . .Mrs. Leo Hanau 

. . : . . 52% 

’12 

Isabel Koss 

* 

45% 

’13 

Edith Halfpenny 

. . . Mrs. E. C. Sperry 

39% 

’14 

Marguerite Schorr 

. . . Ruth Marley 

50% 

’15 

Sarah Butler 

* 

62% 

’16 

Ruth Salom 

. . Catherine McEntegart 

50% 

’17 

Evelyn Davis 

. . .Mrs. Eli Wolbarst 

74% 

’18 

Mrs. Gerald Havwood . . . . 

. . Kathryn Cutler 

55% 

’19 

Dorothy Brockway 

, . . Mrs. Gilbert Schulman 

50% 

’20 

Dorothy Robb 

. . Evelyn Baldwin 

60% 

* None 




WELL? 


CONCERNING MME. CURIE 

An appeal has been made to the Associate Alumnae of 
Barnard College for the fund of $100,000 that is being raised 
by the women of America to present to Mme. Curie a gram 
of radium for experimental purposes. As the great achieve- 
ments of Mme. Curie are well-known it seems unnecessary to 
add anything to the appeal. Those interested may send their 
contributions to the Mme. Curie Radium Fund, 106 East 52nd 
Street, New York City. 


9 


Alumnae desiring a ticket for the meeting at Carnegie Halt 
on May 18 at four o’clock to welcome Mme. Curie should 
apply in person to the Executive Secretary, Students Hall, or 
send her a stamped addressed envelope. The supply is lim- 
ited. 

SWIMMING CLASS FOR CHILDREN OF ALUMNAE 

The Administration is considering the possibility of having 
a swimming class for the children of alumnae on Saturday 
mornings during the winter of 1921-1922. If any of the 
alumnae would be interested, will they please communicate 
with the Dean’s office, giving the ages and sex of the children 
who would like to participate in the class? 

THE ALUMNAE LUNCHEON, JANUARY 29 

One hundred and sixty alumnae and guests enjoyed the 
annual Alumnae Luncheon in the gymnasium of Students Hall 
on Saturday, January 29. Holding it in the gymnasium was 
an innovation, and from the comments heard a generally pleas- 
ant one. There was indeed the greater informality the com- 
mittee hoped for, and but for the presence of fur coats one 
might have fancied one self at the Trustees’ Luncheon in June. 
There were the same circles and semi-circles of chairs socially 
grouping together two or three classes of “age-equals”, and 
affording more of an opportunity to visit around with one’s 
friends than the set tables of the lunchroom ; there was the 
same group of faithfully attending Trustees and the Dean and 
Prof, and Mrs. Brewster and faculty faithfuls, ensconced in 
the centre of things in chairs somewhat more pretensious than 
those of the rest of us. Toward the end all pulled their chairs 
up toward the platform to be within hearing of the speakers. 

Ruth Guernsey, ’14, Alumnae President, welcomed the alum- 
nae to their most intimate and personal event of the year, and 
acquainted the alumnae with alumnae doings. She then intro- 
duced Virginia Gildersleeve, ’99, otherwise known as the Dean. 
Miss Gildersleeve described this college year as “strenuous 
but amiable”. Last year Barnard and other colleges, like the 
rest of the world, felt inclined to be rather cross. The idea 
current in some circles that Barnard is more radical and 
bolshevist than other colleges was abundantly disproved when 
the undergraduate president, returning from the Student 
Government Conference, reported that all the delegates came 
with similar feelings about their own colleges and particularly 
about their sophomores! Miss Gildersleeve told of the hous- 
ing difficulties at Barnard this fall which are described at 
greater length in the report of the Alumnae Trustee. When 
building conditions become “more stable and less scandalous”, 

10 


it is hoped a benefactor will arise who will build first the 
Claremont and then the Broadway wing to Brooks Hall. 

Miss Gildersleeve said that though we might each miss some 
favorite member of the faculty of our own day, perhaps, she 
felt that Barnard to-day continues to offer the finest faculty 
of any of the women’s colleges, and urged the alumnae to 
direct toward Barnard any students of superior merit who 
might come to their notice. In closing the Dean mentioned 
that her tenth year of service was drawing to a close, and 
that she expected to take part of a sabbatical year for the first 
time, sailing for Europe in March. 

The Dean then introduced Dr. Caroline Spurgeon, Professor 
of English Literature in the University of London, President 
of the British Federation of University Women, and of the 
International Federation of University Women. Professor 
Spurgeon is the first woman exchange professor in the United 
States. She has been giving a graduate course at Columbia 
and some undergraduate courses at Barnard. Professor 
Spurgeon gave a most interesting and illuminating analysis of 
the difference between the American and the English college 

girl- 

The reunion committee headed by Hilda Newborg Strauss 
was in charge of the luncheon. 

DINNER AT THE HOTEL GOTHAM 

Barnard Women who attended the dinner at the Hotel 
Gotham on January 28 under the auspices of the International 
Federation of University Women looked upon a “galaxy of 
college presidents’’, heard some good speeches, caught a 
glimpse of peace and a new world through the sympathy of 
college women all over the world and, incidentally, were very 
proud of the Dean who presided. Miss Gildersleeve intro- 
duced Mrs. Catt who was followed by Miss Spurgeon. This 
British woman presented a picture of the results of a sym- 
pathetic attitude among the nations and the alternative of war 
which left a silence when she sat down. Then came the 
presidents: — McCracken of Vassar, Pendleton of Wellesley, 
Thomas of Bryn Mawr, Wooley of Mt. Holyoke, Neilson of 
Smith. Each debated the value of exchanging undergraduate 
students and told what his or her institution was doing along 
this field. 

Between these talks, informal remarks were made from the 
floor by an English girl now at Radcliffe, by a Philippino 
woman, graduate of the ancient university at Manila, by a 
Y. W. C. A. secretary attached to the University of Chile 
and by others. 


II 


ALUMNAE DAY 


Alumnae Day is first of all an occasion for the alumnae to 
renew their contacts and associations with College, to come 
back to Barnard, meet the undergraduates, refresh their mem- 
ories with what is permanent in college life and learn of the 
student interests and activities that are new. It is a day when 
college life is going on as usual and the alumnae are invited to 
share it. Barnard adopted Columbia’s custom last year of 
having Alumnae Day on February 12, which is a holiday for 
most people but a business-as-usual day for the University. 
We hope that this day will become the established one for 
Barnard too, but this year the committee thought it best not 
to choose it because it fell on a Saturday, just two weeks after 
the alumnae luncheon, and also on a day when there would be 
few, if any, undergraduates at college. For this particular 
year, therefore, it was decided to celebrate Alumnae Day on a 
Wednesday, that being the day that the undergraduates and 
alumnae have tea together every week, and March 2 was chosen. 

Having always in mind our aim to keep associations alive 
and green between the alumnae and Barnard, the committee 
was unusually fortunate in being able to lure back Professor 
Robinson to talk in the theater to a group of alumnae, who 
probably all had, some time or other in the last twenty years, 
taken ‘‘four points’ of Robinson”, and were eager to come 
back and have their brain cells stirred up again in the old 
way. Some time or other too, in the college days of most 
alumnae, had been Dr. Crampton’s course in zoology, the cause 
of so many hours of hot discussion in the class studies, after 
a particularly logical and peace of mind destroying lecture 
on Evolution with a capital E. Dr. Crampton had been back 
again for only a few days after a nine months trip in the 
remote regions of Guam and Yap, luckily in time to come to 
the theater too, and talk delightfully to his old students and 
friends. 

It was a family party throughout. After the addresses in 
the theater the alumnae and undergraduates went over to 
Students Hall for tea. 

CLASS PRESIDENTS AND SECRETARIES MEET 

A conference of class presidents and secretaries of the 
classes after 1900 was held on April 5 under the auspices of 
the Membership Committee. 

The meeting was called for the purpose of considering 
methods of increasing the membership of these classes in the 
association and in the course of the discussion many inter- 
esting questions of association policies were discussed such as : 


12 


The scope of the work of the association. 

Size of the reinstatement fee for members who have been 
dropped. 

Holding the alumnae luncheon one year at a hotel and one 
year at College. 

Having class dues include association dues. 

Supplying to class presidents information of what the asso- 
ciation is doing. 

Sending out printed statements of the program of work of 
the association. 

The meeting was very interesting and the vote that was 
taken on several of the questions was forwarded to the Board 
of Directors for their consideration. 


THE ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGIATE ALUMNAE 
CONVENTION 

The Association of Collegiate Alumnae held its biennial con- 
vention in Washington, D. C., March 29 to April 1. Mem- 
bership in this society is open to all graduates of recognized 
women’s colleges. The national dues are two dollars a year ; 
one may affiliate with a local branch if one wishes or one 
may be a “general” member participating- only in the na- 
tional activities. To the convention each Branch may send 
delegates according to the number of members it has ; there 
are also delegates-at-large to represent the general members; 
each college may send one representative, and each alumnae 
association may send delegates. Each alumnae association is 
allowed one delegate for each 100 paid up members it has, a 
councillor for the first 500 members and another councillor 
for 1000 additional members. The councillor acts as chair- 
man of the delegation and is a member of the Council. At this 
convention Barnard College was represented by Professor 
Margaret Maltby. The Councillor for the Associate Alumnae, 
Eleanor Osborne, was ill and Mrs. Paul Strong Achilles (Edith 
Mulhall T4) attended the convention as acting councillor. 

The association elected to membership the Southern Asso- 
ciation of College Women and changed its name. The organi- 
zation will hereafter be known as the American Association of 
University Women. This is the American organization of col- 
lege women which is federated with similar organizations in 
other countries to form the International Federation of Uni- 
versity Women. 

The A. A. of U. W. will meet annually hereafter. The 
newly elected President is Miss Ada Comstock, Dean of 
Smith College. 


13 


CONFERENCE OF AFFILIATED ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATIONS 


During’ the convention of the A. C. A. one day is set aside 
for conferences of different groups — Women Trustees, Deans 
and Professors, Secondary School Principals, and Affiliated 
Alumnae Associations. 

The conference on affiliated alumnae associations was both 
interesting and helpful. The question whether the alumnae 
associations should undertake other than college interests was 
discussed fully and the vote taken showed the consensus of 
opinion was against the associations entering non-collegiate 
fields. It appeared evident that alumnae associations need all 
their time and energy to strengthen their college. 

Suggestions for financing alumnae associations were given 
by Smith, Vassar, Mt. Holyoke and Bryn Mawr. None of 
these associations is financed by dues alone but by extra con- 
tributions from their alumnae. Ninety-one per cent, of the 
alumnae of Bryn Mawr belong to their alumnae association. 

Smith, Vassar, Mt. Holyoke and Bryn Mawr have alumnae 
publications — some quarterlies, some monthlies. Such publi- 
cations keep the alumnae informed of college activities and 
interested in alumnae work. 

The next conference will be held at the A. A. of U. W. 
Convention next year. The Barnard representative will act 
as chairman. 

BARNARD ALUMNAE LUNCH IN WASHINGTON 

On Thursday, March 31, Barnard women in Washington 
held an alumnae luncheon in the Y. W. C. A. rooms. 

BARNARD OVERSEAS WORK CONTINUES 

The fund given by the Barnard alumnae for Red Cross work 
has been turned over for use in the devastated area of France 
under the auspices of the French government. This work is 
being supervised by Mrs. Van Allen Shields, (Rose Lathrop, 
’98) and is being carried on in Marcoing and neighboring 
villages. 

Several alumnae are still abroad doing welfare work : 

Marie Louise Fontaine, ’06, who has just completed her 
work with the Rockefeller Foundation in the anti-tuberculosis 
campaign, is now tutoring the children of American Army 
officers in the Coblenz district. 

Muriel Valentine, ’07, is working in the center at Anizy-le- 
Chateau under the American Committee for Devastated France. 
On February 25 a benefit bridge was given at the Hotel Plaza 


14 





































STUDENTS HALL FROM THE GARDEN 


BUILT BY MR. SCHIFF ON THE LAND GIVEN BY MRS. ANDERSON 



to raise funds for her work. At this bridge a “Barnard room 
was set aside and the tables in this room were taken by Muriel 
Valentine’s college friends. 

Dr. Ruth Guy, ’12, is doing research work in Glasgow, 
Scotland. 

Jessie Nottingham, ’10, had to give up her work in Poland 
last August when the American Red Cross retired before the 
advance of the Bolshevik army. After working at headquar- 
ters in Paris she has returned to Warsaw and is again engaged 
in the field work of the Red Cross. 


Since the last Alumnae Bulletin was published Barnard has 
lost four of her most valued friends. We announce with 
deep regret the death of Mr. Frederic P>. Jennings, clerk of 
the Board of Trustees and a founder of the college, Dr. L. 
Herbert Alexander, instructor in Romance Languages, Mr. 
Jacob H. Schiff and Mrs. A. A. Anderson. 

Mr. Schiff will be remembered with gratitude not only as the 
first treasurer of Barnard College and the generous donor 
of Students Flail, but also as one who saw clearly the ideal of 
Barnard as the college representing most accurately the dif- 
ferent types of citizens which make up the Republic of the 
United States. 

Mrs. Anderson became trustee of the college in 1894 and 
since then has been its devoted friend and greatest benefactor. 
In 1897 Mrs. Anderson gave the college Milbank Hall and 
six years later purchased the land south of Milbank to 116th 
Street. The gift of this land on which Students and Brooks 
Halls stand made possible the growth of Barnard and its giver 
will be held in grateful memory by the alumnae. 


REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE ASSOCIATE 
ALUMNAE OF BARNARD COLLEGE 1919-1920 

Your president has presided over one special meeting of 
the Associate Alumnae, the annual luncheon, and all meetings 
of the Board of Directors since her election to office in 
November 1919. She has also attended some of the meetings 
held by various committees. 

Your president was present at the luncheon given to wel- 
come Miss Spurgeon and Mrs. McLean of England when they 
visited America during the winter of 1919-20. She had the 
honor to represent the Barnard alumnae at the opening meeting 
of the Mt. Holyoke Endowment Fund Campaign and at a 
luncheon given by the Smith College Endowment Fund cam- 


17 


paign. She also presented the prize given each year by the 
Barnard Alumnae Club of Mt. Vernon to the student of the Mt. 
Vernon High School making the best extemporaneous speech. 

Endowment Fund work absorbed much time throughout the 
year. An intercollegiate committee of which Miss Gildersleeve 
was chairman was formed with representatives from Smith, 
Mt. Holyoke, Bryn Mawr and your president representing 
Barnard. This committee met at various times to discuss en- 
dowment fund campaigns. Your president visited the national 
endowment fund headquarters of Smith, and Bryn Mawr and 
the New York City headquarters of Mt. Holyoke. 

The reports of the various committees of the alumnse will 
tell of their work in detail. Your president desires to thank 
officers, directors and committee members for their help and 
cooperation ; in particular she wishes to express her gratitude 
to the Clerk and the Executive Secretary who never failed in 
any emergency to serve Barnard alumnse in the best way 
possible. 

Your president after a year in office begs to make the fol- 
lowing suggestions : 

1. That By-Law No. XI, Sect. I, be amended so that there 
shall be five regular meetings of the Board of Directors. The 
meeting in April at a time when activities are at their height 
is too overcrowded to permit all reports to be read and dis- 
cussed. Two regular meetings should be planned during 
March and April so that reports crowded out of the first 
meeting because of lack of time will be considered at the 
second. Special meetings are not satisfactory as they are not 
well attended and it is not fair for some committee reports to 
be read at a special meeting instead of at the regular meeting 
of the Board. 

2. That the alumnae appoint a “House Committee’’ or a 
committee with 'some other name whose function will be the 
care and planning of the furniture in the Alumnae Room. It 
is, suggested that this committee consists of the executive sec- 
retary and four other members each appointed for four years — 
but that the first appointment be for i, 2, 3, 4, years respect- 
ively, so that one new member is appointed each year. The 
function of this committee should be to plan for the buying of 
new furniture and equipment for the alumnse office and to plan 
for the renovating and renewing of the furniture now in our 
possession. This committee should make recommendations to 
the Finance Committee in regard to money needed for renew- 
ing and replacing the contents of the Alumnse Room. At 
present the officers of the association are elected for one year 
only and so can not make plans for future recovering and 
caring for the furniture. 


18 


3. That the Association raise funds to warrant engaging 
an executive secretary full time for at least nine months of the 
year. The work which should be done in order for the Asso- 
ciate Alumnae of Barnard College to fulfill its function re- 
quires the entire time of an executive secretary. Although 
in theory the position is now a paid one in practice it is mostly 
a volunteer one as the meager salary is sufficient for only a 
small part of the time and thought the executive secretary 
gives. It will soon be impossible to engage anyone for one- 
quarter time when it is known that the work to be done requires 
full time. A thorough examination of the financial situations 
among other alumnae associations reveals the fact that none is 
supported by dues alone, but that alumnae financially able con- 
tribute to the support of the alumnae associations. It is earn- 
estly recommended that $1000 be raised at once to supplement 
the appropriation of the Associate Alumnae for an executive 
secretary. 

4. That the Associate Alumnae of Barnard College make a 
request to the Board of Trustees of the college for a second 
alumnae trustee. It is suggested that the second trustee be 
elected every four years, two years after the present trustee. 
Thus a new alumnae trustee would be elected every two years 
for a period of four years. When the first alumnae trustee 
was appointed the graduates of the college numbered about 
200, there are now over 2000 living Barnard graduates. 

Edith Mulhall-Achilles, 

President. 

REPORT OF ALUMNAE TRUSTEE 

Many interesting problems have presented themselves to the 
Trustees during the past year. Foremost among the questions 
of especial interest to us as alumnae are the creation of a 
second Alumnae Trustee, voted at the December meeting and 
since made possible by a chang'e in the charter, and the very 
serious problem of the lack of proper housing facilities for 
out-of-town students. This latter question has been compli- 
cated by the emergency laws enforced during the past year 
which prevent landlords from forcing out tenants at the ex- 
piration of their leases. As a result of this situation, although 
Columbia University rented to Barnard College for dormitorv 
purposes one of their newly acquired apartment houses at 39 
Claremont Avenue, known as John Jay Hall, we have obtained 
possession of only five of the twenty-four apartments, whereas 
thirteen leases expired last autumn and the rest should term- 
inate this year. As chairman of the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds, your Alumnae Trustee has been asked to handle 


19 


this problem so that the students may be more comfortably 
housed next year and every effort will be made to secure 
adequate accommodations. When the students arrived for the 
opening- of the college term last fall, instead of the pleasant 
rooms which they had expected to find awaiting them, they 
were ushered into a regular army barrack hurriedly equipped 
in the gymnasium. Let it be said to the credit of every one 
concerned, that no one complained except a very few faint 
hearted, weak sisters, who returned to their homes and who 
have probably not been missed — every one among the students 
and the administrative staff cheerfully helped to make the best 
of a disagreeable situation. The old cooperative apartments 
on 1 1 6th Street were retained and filled to capacity, Brooks 
Hall found it possible to crowd in about nine more girls, the 
two rest rooms in Students Hall were made into dormitories 
for four girls each, so that we have managed to live through 
a happy and successful winter in spite of our difficulties, and 
sociability flourished as never before, thanks to the splendid 
cooperation of undergraduates, alumnae and administrative 
staff. We wish to assure them all of our hearty appreciation 
and thanks and to tell them that every possible effort will be 
made to make dormitory life pleasanter next year. 

Sara Straus Hess, Alumnae Trustee. 

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

After a year’s work in the office of the Associate Alumnae 
the executive secretary recommends that the work of the 
association be enlarged along three different fields. 

1. Closer association with the undergraduates. 

2. A more frequent alumnae publication. 

3. Organization of the alumnae in the suburban towns. 

The need of a closer contact with the student body was 

seen by the Drive Committee during the winter of 1919-1920 
and a great deal was done to bring about a closer association 
between the undergraduates and the alumnae. This work has 
been carried on by the John Jay and Brooks Hall Committees, 
the Off Campus Committee, the Membership Committee and 
the Employment Committee. The report of the work of these 
committees appears elsewhere in this publication. The execu- 
tive secretary also urges that more of the alumnae subscribe to 
and read the undergraduate Bulletin and that they patronize 
with greater generosity undergraduate activities. 

A more frequent alumnae publication is needed not only to 
give better news of the Barnard graduates, but also to place 
the policies and program of the association more constantly 
before its members. No very animated discussion can be 


20 


carried on through the columns of a publication that comes 
out but once or twice a year. The chief interest that the 
average alumna has in the association is her desire to support 
a definite program of constructive work which it has endorsed. 
It is therefore advisable that this program be discussed through 
the columns of the alumnae publication as thoroughly as 
possible. 

The executive secretary is very anxious to have Barnard 
clubs formed by the alumnae living outside of New York City. 
There is no stronger basis for an alumnae club than the 
geographical unit. Thanks to the efforts of Anna E. H. 
Meyer, ’98, a geographical file of the alumnae has been made. 
This file shows the increasing number of Barnard graduates 
who are living in cities other than New York. Letters are 
being written to different alumnae living out of town who 
might be interested in forming a Barnard Club in the center 
in which they live and any suggestions from the alumnae as to 
forming these clubs will be most welcome. 

Do not go off on any trip until you have come up to the 
office and looked over the geographical file. Your route may 
take you past the home of an old friend of undergraduate days 
who would welcome some news of the college. 

Anna C. Reiley, Executive Secretary. 


REPORT OF THE JOHN JAY AND BROOKS HALL 
COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 

The John Jay Committee on Social Activities was formed 
last April, when the Dean and Board of Trustees entrusted 
the social life of the new John Jay building to an alumnae 
committee with the idea that the continued cooperation be- 
tween alumnae and undergraduates would be of great value. 
Owing to the enforced delay of the college in moving into 
the John Jay building, the social committee did not function 
until November. The committee then attended the opening of 
the building and began regular meetings with Miss Abbott, 
the director of this building, discussing social plans with her 
and through her cooperating- with the student head of the 
house in whatever way seemed best. 

In December Miss Weeks, becoming impressed with the 
value of alumnae and student cooperation, asked the John lav 
committee to extend their field of activities to Brooks Hall. 
So the John Jay committee of five members added two new 
alumnae members, who had previously held executive positions 
at Brooks Hall, and became the John Jay and Brooks Hall 
Committee on Social Activities. 


21 


John Jay and Brooks Hall have both entertained the alumnae 
committee at tea, and the following alumnae have generously 
opened their homes to John Jay and Brooks Hall girls — Mrs. 
Alfred Hess, 'oo, on Thanksgiving Day, Miss Edith Morgan, 
T 7, on Christmas Day, and on February 17 Mrs. James Lees 
Laidlaw, ’02, invited a group of John Jay and Brooks Hall girls 
to meet a large number of artistic, literary and professional 
guests, such as Miss Zona Gale. Mr. Edwin Markham, Mrs. 
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Miss Dorothy Gish and Mr. Seton- 
Thompson. Late in March Mrs. George McAneny, ’99, is 
inviting another group of dormitory girls to her home. On 
the Sunday night before Christmas, the John Jay girls, in 
collaboration with the alumnae committee, invited the Brooks 
Hall girls to an evening Christmas party at college, which 
proved to be a charming and unique entertainment. Early in 
May the alumnae committee are planning a large evening party 
at college to be given for all the John Jay and Brooks Hall 
girls. 

The plan of the committee is to develop as much as possible 
intercourse between alumnae and students and also to bring 
some of the life of our great city to the students. Our alumnae 
have a unique opportunity for service to their college, as their 
college is at their hand, and they alone, knowing the needs of 
the college, can accomplish the most for it and the community. 

Mabel Parsons, Chairman. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL 
ACTIVITIES OF STUDENTS 
LIVING OFF THE CAMPUS 

The success of the John Jay-Brooks Hall Committee led to 
the feeling that similar work might well be organized for the 
students from out of town not living on the campus. Con- 
sequently, the Alumnae Committee on Social Activities for the 
Off-Campus Students, consisting of eight members, was ap- 
pointed late in December. 

The work of the committee began during the holidays. For 
those girls whose homes were too far away to be reached, 
teas were given at the homes of Miss Estelle O’Brien, T6, 
Miss Amy Jennings, ’20, and Mrs. Dudley Miles, To. The 
alumnae found it a great pleasure to meet the undergraduates 
in their homes in a less formal way than is usual. 

On February fourteenth all of the off-campus girls were in- 
vited to meet the committee in the College Parlor. The mem- 
bers of the John Jay committee were also present and ten of 
the John Jay students assisted as hostesses. The alumnae 
have shown a great interest in the activities of the committee. 


22 


One very delightful tea has been given by Mrs. James Lees 
Laidlaw, and on March 21 Mrs. George McAneny is enter- 
taining about fifty of the undergraduates and a number of 
professional alumnae at her home. Each time different groups 
from the dormitories and from the off-campus students are 
asked so that all those who wish to know the alumnae may do 
so. In May our final social event will take the form of a 
general party arranged by the students under the guidance of 
Mrs. Lowther and members from both of the alumnae social 
committees for undergraduates. This will probably be home 
talent and good fun. 

This committee does not expect to confine itself to social 
activities. It hopes to secure a room in Students Hall to be 
used as an entertainment room by the off-campus girls. If 
the girls are interested, the committee will be very glad to see 
them form into a group similar to the dormitory groups. The 
closer those students are to the college, the more they will get 
from and give to the college. The alumnae hope to become 
better acquainted with the girls from out of town for these 
students have so much to bring to us from other parts of our 
own and other countries. 

There is also the feeling that Barnard has a rare opportunity 
through its location and some of those most interested are 
anxious to bring glimpses of the distinctive features of New 
York to Barnard. 

The committee feels that its work is just starting, and that 
its report must, therefore, consist of hopes and suggestions. 

Florence; Read Miles, Chairman . 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP 
AND STATISTICS 

Since the opening of the current fiscal year the Membership 
Committee has devoted itself chiefly to building up the mem- 
bership of the Associate Alumnae and stimulating interest in 
it. In this work it has been supported by several of the class 
organizations and has received great assistance from the un- 
tiring efforts of the Executive Secretary. 

Campaigns undertaken by 1905, 1909 and 1910 have led to a 
considerable number or reinstatements from those classes, and 
have made themselves felt in others as well. 1920 has already 
furnished a much larger proportion of numbers than is usual 
with the younger classes. There have also been four new 
associate members, 12 new life members, and 32 who have 
begun life memberships on the installment plan. All these 
movements are, of course, continuing, with fresh results from 
week to week. 


23 


On March 7 the membership committee entertained the 
senior class at a tea in the Conference Room. In spite of the 
many rival demands upon their energies a large number of 
seniors attended and listened to a brief address by Miss 
Guernsey, setting forth the purpose of the Associate Alumnae 
and its claims to the support of every loyal alumna. 

On the evening of April 5 there will be a meeting of officers 
of the classes from 1901 through 1920 to discuss further plans 
for increasing the membership of the association. The com- 
mittee will welcome any suggestions from alumnae that will 
tend to assist its efforts to increase its usefulness. 

Theodora Baldwin, Chairman. 


REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
EMPLOYMENT 

Oct. 16, 1919 — Oct. 15, 1920. 

On February 20 a vocational conference was held in the 
College Parlor, at which Barnard graduates told of the work 
they were doing, and gave the undergraduates detailed in- 
formation as to the best way to fit themselv.es for similar lines 
of work. The speakers included a gymnasium -director of the 
Harlem YAV.C.A., an employment manager in a silk mill, a 
commercial mathematician, a bacteriologist, a newspaper 
worke_r, a social research worker, a teacher and an exponent 
of scientific management as a business. 

Further vocational information was given to the under- 
graduates when Miss Emma Hirth, director of the Bureau of 
Vocational Information spoke in college assembly to the juniors 
and seniors on March 16 and to the freshmen and sophomores 
on March 23. It was felt that most of the undergraduates 
could be reached in this way. Miss Hirth said that the greatest 
need for college women at the present time is in the professions 
of teaching, medicine and nursing. One of the most pertinent 
remarks was that the most important element for success in 
any line is to have a long plan and not to consider work as a 
depot on the road to matrimony, but to consider yourself as 
a worker for the future. 

[This year the vocational conference was held April 4. The 
following alumnpe spoke: Helen Bradbeer, Elsa Becker, ’14; 
Babette Deutsch, ’17; Mary Barber, T8 : Margery Eggleston, 
To; Svea Nelson, ’15. Vera Klopman, Alice Judson, ’19; Helen 
Hicks, ’20. — -Ed.] 


24 


The appointment work for the year is as follows : 

Appointment Work of Committee on Employment 
Associate Alumnae of Barnard College 

Oct. 16, 1919— Oct. 15, 1920 

Applications from employers made to the Committee and placements 
resulting, so far as reported, have been made as follows : 



1919-1920 ' 

1918-1919 

Type of Work 

Appli- 

Place- 

Appli- 

Place- 


cations 

meats 

cations 

ments 

Dean of women, school principal... 

... 11 

0 

5 

0 

Teacher 

... 144 

28 

192 

30 

Tutor, teaching governess 

... 126 

50 

101 

45 

Secretary and stenographer 

. .. 177 

42 

140 

36 

Executive secretary 

... 11 

2 

10 

6 

Clerk, miscellaneous 

. .. 191 

126 

201 

136 

Filing clerk, librarian 

.. . 37 

10 

12 

3 

Literary and editorial assistant, research 

worker, translator 42 

16 

29 

11 

Mathematical clerk and statistician . 

. .. 55 

26 

41 

21 

Social worker 

. . . 46 

6 

42 

5 

Employment manager and assistant . 

... 7 

2 

11 

0 

Scientific laboratory assistant, psy- 

chologist 

.. . 17 

5 

11 

4 

Advertising and publicity worker . . . 

... 9 

2 

7 

4 

Camp counsellor 

... 26 

11 

13 

2 

Mother’s helper and companion 

. .. 125 

27 

130 

47 

Houseworker and summer waitress. 

. .. 30 

7 

13 

5 

Miscellaneous 

. . . 71 

45 

57 

30 


— 

— 

— 

— 


1125 

405 

1015 

385 

Duration of Position 

Permanent full-time positions 

... 551 

100 

520 

114 

Part-time positions for 10 weeks... 

. .. 181 

32 

174 

54 

Temporary positions 

... 393 

273 

321 

217 


1125 

405 

1015 

385 

Status of Appointee 

No. Po- 
sitions 

Indi- 

viduals 

Pos. 

Indiv. 

Alumnae 

... 223 

148 

221 

160 

Students 

... 179 

128 

161 

103 

Non-Barnard candidates 

... 3 

3 

3 

3 

Less duplicates 


279 

5 


266 

5 


405 

274 

385 

261 

Estimate of Earnings Represented. 

. . . $132,018 

$101,844 


The year as a whole showed an increase of io% in the calls 
from employers and of 5% in the appointments, but in both 
cases this increase represents mainly temporary and part-time 


25 


positions. During the last few months on the other hand, 
and especially this Fall, there has been a slackening in the 
demand for workers. This is especially marked in the better- 
paid openings ; we have on our lists at present more candidates 
for “really interesting” executive positions than we have been 
able to place, and even in regard to the less important stenog- 
rapher-secretarial calls there has been a considerable change 
since August. Then we had a quantity of demands from 
employers that we could not fill, because none of our candidates 
wanted to work in the summer. In September, when the 
applicants returned to town, the demand suddenly vanished. 

Salaries have, of course, increased. Among the members of 
the class of 1920 placed by this office the lowest salary for full 
time work is $1000 and the highest, earned by an experienced 
candidate, $1700. 

In view of the recent discussion of the teaching situation, 
the plans of the class of 1920 may be of interest. Out of the 
80% of the class whose plans we know, 30% are teaching or 
preparing to teach, 50% are or will be in other occupations. 

We regret to report that we still find ourselves less successful 
in fitting the older alumnae into responsible positions than we 
are in making the first contracts for the seniors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Agnes L. Dickson. Chairman. 

[The college secretary, Katharine S. Doty, ’04, is in charge of 

the actual placement work. Ed.] 

REPORT OF THE STUDENTS’ AID COMMITTEE 

1919—1920 

The Students’ Aid Committee beg to report that they have 
made ten loans during the past year, amounting to $1,100. 
They were given to five seniors, four juniors, and one sopho- 
more. 

Mabel Parsons, Chairman. 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE ASSOCIATE 
ALUMNAE OF BARNARD COLLEGE 

October 15, 1919 — October 15, 1920 
I. Students Aid Fund — Farmers Loan and Trust Company 


Balance on hand October 15, 1919 $2,396.65 

Income — 

Interest on Account, December 1 $17.87 

Interest on Account, June 1 22.16 

Loans repaid and dividends, Feb. 6 246.75 

Loans repaid and dividends, June 30 919.21 

Loans repaid and dividends, Oct. 15 418.73 1,624.72 


Total $4,021.37 


26 


Disbursements — 

Committee Treasurer, February 6 $500.00 

Committee Treasurer, October 15 500.00 1,000.00 


$3,021.37 

II. Dormitory Surplus Fund 

Balance on hand October 15, 1919 $2,449.84 

Interest on Account in Emigrant Industrial 

Savings Bank $ 3.60 

Interest on Account in East River Savings 

Institution 14.08 

Interest on Bonds 85.00 102.68 


$2,552.52 

Emmigrant Industrial Savings Bank...$ 93.22 

East River Savings Institution 459.30 

Liberty Bonds 2,000.00 

III. Life Membership Fund— East River Savings Institution and 
Liberty Bonds 

Balance on Hand October 15, 1919 $2,499.12 

Income — 

Interest on Account $ 10.16 

Interest on Bonds 149.84 

30 Life Memberships 750.00 

79 Partial Payments 395.00 

$1,305.00 

Disbursements — 

Interest transferred to General Fund $ 160.00 


$3,644.12 

IV. General Fund 

Balance on hand October 15, 1919 $ 85.72 

Receipts — 

Annual Dues $1,200.00 

Interest on Life Membership 160.00 

Alumnae Day Refund (1918-1919) 32.50 

Camp Upton Committee 17.00 

War Service Committee 279.50 

Committee on Community Recreation 150.00 

Exchange 7.90 

Committee on Community Recreation Fund 757.34 2,604.24 


$2,689.96 

Disbursements — 

President $ .60 

Treasurer 7.00 

Executive Secretary 

Salary 555.52 

Telephone, etc 25.47 

Convention 57.22 

Postage, printing and stationery 439.86 


27 


Alumnae Day Committee 14.30 

Students Aid Committee 4.49 

Publicity Committee 2.40 

Nominating Committee (1919-1920) 1.25 

Drive Committee 216.90 

Cooperative Dormitory Committee 6.70 

Membership Committee 4.25 

Committee on By-Laws and Legislation.... .66 

Association of Collegiate Alumnae 17.50 

College Settlement Association 5.00 

Exchange 1.60 

Committee on Community Recreation Fund 742.50 


Total Expenditures $2,103.22 

Balance in Fifth Avenue Bank 555.34 

Postage and Stationary 31.40 


$2,689.96 

Myra McLean, Treasurer. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 
OF THE ASSOCIATE ALUMNAE, 
OCTOBER 30, 1920 

The Finance Committee is pleased to report a great im- 
provement in the resources of the General Fund. We have 
now a balance of over $500.00 as against about $85.00 last 
year. This is due to rigid pruning of budgets, and the care 
exercised by officers and committees in administering their 
funds. 

Last fall in computing the assets of the General Fund, it 
became at once obvious that dues of $1.00 from about 750 
members, plus about $200.00 from interest of the Life Mem- 
bership and the Dormitory Surplus funds would never cover a 
budget of well over $1,000.00. 

To prevent a recurrence of this difficulty a special meeting 
of the Associate Alumnae was called in December and the dues 
increased to $2.00 a year. With a normal interest and increase 
in membership the association should have an adequate income 
for the ensuing year. The income will not however be doubled, 
because the amounts realized from the partial payment life 
membership plan are transferred to capital account. 

Last autumn the surplus in the hands of the War Service 
Committee was at their recommendation turned over to the 
Barnard Drive Committee. After this was exhausted the 
college assumed the expenses of this committee. 

Owing to extra expenses and rather small revenue from 
dues during the war the association found itself without funds 
to publish the usual five yearly statistical directory of alumme. 
The general changes due to the war made it particularly neces- 
sary that at least a directory of addresses should be printed, 


28 


and the college very generously assumed this burden for us. 
This report you have doubtless all received. This is however 
purely an Associate Alumnae function, and our part should be 
definitely provided for. 

For details of moneys in special funds, budgets and ex- 
penditures you are referred to the Treasurer’s report. 

Alte Stilweel Kervan, Chairman. 

REPORT OF THE DRIVE COMMITTEE 

The Drive Committee beg to report that the amount of 
money which they have raised for the college is as follows : 


General Endowment $108,697.00 

Undergraduates 7,074.00 

19^8 1,545.00 

I9U 2,985.00 

Good Government Chair 10,877.00 


$131,178,00 

The undergraduates from 1920-23 will go down as Founders 
and the classes of 1900, 1918, and 1897 all gave as classes. 
The class of 1915 is raising a Helen Hartley Jenkins Fund. 

This sum has enabled the college to pay off its debts and 
thereby secure the amounts of $200,000 and $100,000 promised 
by the Rockefeller and Carnegie Foundations respectively, 
which completed the long-sought-after $1,000,000 fund. 

The committee found themselves hampered by certain pre- 
vailing conditions at college which caused apathy among 
alumnae and outsiders. These conditions have been reported 
at length to the Board of Directors, who in turn have reported 
them to the Dean. The committee hope that they have ac- 
complished much for the college in arousing the interest of 
alumnae and undergraduates and also that they have succeeded 
in bringing the college somewhat before the public. 

The committee have not yet met this fall and are therefore 
unable to report any plans for the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hilda N. Strauss, 

Executive Secretary, Drive Committee. 

COMMITTEE 

Mrs. George McAneny, Chairman. 

Miss Mabel Parsons, Secretary. 

Ex-Officio: Mrs. Paul S. Achilles, 

President of Barnard Alumnae Association. 


29 


REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE COOPERATIVE 
DORMITORY COMMITTEE 

October 23, 1920 

The Alumnae Cooperative Dormitory Committee are pleased 
to report that during the past year, October 1, 1919 — October 
1, 1920, the dormitory has covered all expenses, including the 
salary of a director for which the Trustees made themselves 
responsible. The detailed treasurer’s account is attached to 
this report. During the three summer months the apartments 
were placed under the direction of a Mrs. Collins, who paid a 
regular sum monthly for the cost of the apartments and fur- 
niture and rented the rooms to summer school students and 
transients under the name of the Alumnae Cooperative Dor- 
mitory. 

During the past year there have been 44 girls in the Dormi- 
tory. Miss Helen Abbott has been the very successful director 
of the dormitory and the committee are much pleased that she 
has been secured by the college for the head of the new John 
Jay building. 

On October 1 the leases for the cooperative dormitory ex- 
pired and the apartments are now held by the college in the 
present housing emergency. As the committee looks back over 
the four years of the cooperative scheme, they feel that the 
plan has worked most successfully in giving the students a 
greater social responsibility as well as financial aid. The life 
of the student has been a happy life in a homelike atniosphere. 
It is seen by the treasurer’s report that the dormitory has paid 
all running expenses and the committee is dissolving itself 
with a small balance. The committee is much pleased that the 
cooperative scheme is being carried on in John Jay Hall with 
its larger field of activity and hopes that it will be a permanent 
feature of Barnard dormitory life and will prove the same 
benefit to the students, the college, and the community. 

The alumnae are to have a connection with the new John 
Jay building, which is to be partly cooperative and partly 
non-cooperative, as the social life of the building has been 
placed by the Dean and Trustees in the charge of an alumnae 
committee. This committee, as appointed by the Board of 
Directors last spring, is composed of three of the present Co- 
operative Dormitory Committee and two of the Class of 1920 
who lived at the Cooperative Dormitory in their senior year. 
It is confidently believed that this continued cooperation be- 
tween alumnae and undergraduates will be of great value. 

The committee are recommending to the Board of Directors 
that the sum in the treasury be spent as follows: $100.00 on 
a Victrola for the John Jay building and the remainder on the 
salary of a full time alumnae executive secretary. 

Mabel Parsons, Chairman. 


30 


Dormitory Account 1919-1920 


Received — 

Deposits $ 200.00* 

Board and Rooms 16,103.54 

Guests 244.57 

Phones 12.00 


$16,560.11 

$ 7,370.16 
2,558.36 
317.30 
197.72 
117.20 
35.90 
4,932.80 
40.72 
31.80 
7.87 
9.06 
339.18 
72.78 
7.50 
70.15* 


$16,108.50 


Balance $ 451.61 

Against the above balance the following amount is payable : 

Bills $ 130.00 

Allowances to Landlord, according to Lease, 

estimated at 150.00 


Expended — 

Rent 

Service 

Laundry 

Electricity 

Gas 

Phones 

Food 

Ice 

Doctor, Nurse, Medical Supplies 

Stationery 

Insurance 

Household Equipment 

Miscellaneous 

Refunds for Christmas Vacation 

Deposits returned 


$280.00 

Estimated Balance in Treasury $171.61 

* The apparent discrepancy between Deposits Received and Deposits 
Returned is due to the fact that some girls had their small accounts 
charged to their deposits. 

As a profit on the two years running expenses at 99 Claremont 
Avenue, there is in addition in the Savings Bank $461.21 and interest. 

ALUMNAE RAISE $1500 FOR EUROPEAN WORK 

The Barnard Hoover Relief Committee, as part of the Wom- 
en’s European Relief Council collected $1500 in answer to a 
single post card appeal without any follow up. This appeal 
went to Barnard graduates in New York City and vicinity 
only. As a great many alumnae have given to this fund 
through their school, church or club organization, this sum 
does not represent the total amount given by Barnard women. 

The members of the committee wish to thank the alumnae for 
the support given them in this work. 

COMMITTEE : 

Ruth Guernsey, ’14, ex-officio 
Edith Mulhall Achilles, ’14 
Hilda Newborc Strauss, ’00, Chairman 

3i 


ALUMNAE RAISE OVER $400 FOR COLLEGE 
SETTLEMENT 


It will be a source of the greatest satisfaction to the alumnae, 
as it has been to their representative on the College Women’s 
Auxiliary of the College Settlement, to know of their generous 
response to the recent appeal for the settlement. For the 
second time Barnard holds the first or second place for the 
amount subscribed among the fourteen college organizations 
represented on the Auxiliary. 

Ninety-four Barnard alumnae responded to the appeal with 
subscriptions from one to twenty-five dollars, making a total 
of $415 — exclusive of the $10 voted last fall toward the ex- 
penses of the Auxiliary. It may be of interest to note that 
subscriptions came from eight different states, as far west as 
Washington and as far south as North Carolina — and from 
the following classes : 

No. of No. of 


Class 

subscribers 

Class 

subscribers 

’93 

0 

’08 

3 

’94 *’95 

2 *3 

’09 

3 

’96 

6 

’10 

2 

’97 

’98 

4 

’11 

4 

2 

’12 

3 

’99 

9 

’i3 

2 

’00 

8 

’i 4 

5 

’01 

6 

’i 5 

3 

’02 

3 

’16 

1 

’03 

2 

’i7 

3 

’04 

4 

’18 

1 

’05 

3 

’W 

’20 

4 

’06 

’07 

0 

6 

2 


Although a date for responses was set on the appeal, it is 
gratifying that subscriptions are still coming in. If any 
alumnae are seized with an irresistible desire to send new or 
belated contributions, they will be most gratefully received 
The settlement still, as ever, is sadly in need of funds. 

AdalinE C. Wheelock, Barnard Representative. 


32 


HELEN HARTLEY GEER MEMORIAL FUND 


The classmates and other friends of Helen Hartley Jenkins 
Geer, ’15, have completed the $5,000 Memorial Fund to estab- 
lish a Foundership in her name. The income of this fund is 
to be used for the general expenses of the college. 

Helen Hartley Geer, “Bab”, as she is affectionately re- 
membered by all her friends was so loyal and enthusiastic an 
undergraduate and alumna of Barnard, that it is an appropriate 
tribute to enroll her name among the Founders. 


The gateway to Students Hall given by Mrs. Helen Hartley 
Jenkins and Miss Grace Hartley Jenkins in memory of Helen 
Hartley Jenkins Geer is now being built. It will be a beautiful 
addition to the campus. 


33 


HELP WANTED 


The Statistics Committee would be glad of any assistance in tracing 
the following alumnae whose mail has been returned by the Post Office : 

Amy, Helen L. ’ll : Brown, Ann Eliza ’05 : de La Fontaine, Elsie ’20: 
Freidenrich, Edyth ’06: Gray, Elizabeth ’ll: Hart, Adelaide ’06: Hope, 
Ida May '03: Jones, Edna B. ’03: Kraker, Rose ’01: Landau, Laura ’04: 
Lustgarten, Augusta ’ll: McLaury, Mrs. Edward R. (Mabel Elting 
’01): Morehouse, Edna ’08: Newmark, Sophie ’13: Phillips, Mrs. 
Charles F. (Eleanor Parker T 7) : Rothenberg, Anna T4: Schimmel, 
Mrs. John Jr. (Edith Berry ’01) : Schloss, Mrs. Walter (Dean Smith 
’09) : Somerville, Mrs. Albert A. (Emma Rapelye ’13) : Smaltz, Mrs. 
Frederick (Jessie Haynes ’06) : Spicer, Mrs. Allan W. (Claire Martin 
’13) : Watson, Mrs. Williarfi S. (Rose Johnston ’04). 

1895 

Alice Seligsberg has iust returned from Palestine where she was 
executive direfctor of Orphan Work for the Joint Distribution Com- 
mission. 

1899 

Ruth Overton Grknwood is associate editor of Photoplay. 

1900 

Virginia Newcomb is secretary for women’s work, Institute of In- 
ternational Education. Ethel Dawbarn, T8, is Miss Newcomb’s sec- 
retary. 

Edna Bell Simpson died on January 29, 1920. For many years after 
graduation she was engaged in educational work, at one time being 
dean o'f the Presbyterian College for Women in North Carolina. For 
the last few years she has been occupied with civic and social work in 
her home at Beaver Falls, Pa. 

1901 

Pauline Dederer, Associate Professor of Zoology at Connecticut Col 
lege, spent last summer at Woods Hole doing research work at the 
Marine Biological Laboratory. 

A series of articles including “The Protecting Sex” and “Yesterday’s 
Daughters” by Mary Fisher Torrance have been published during the 
winter in the New York Times’ Book Review. 

H. Elizabeth Cutting is engaged in executive work in California for 
the Travel Bureau. 

Euphemia Johnson is social director and teacher at Iowa State Col- 
lege. 

Jannetta Studdiford Reed is teaching in the primary department of 
the Kimberly School in Montclair. 

1902 

Adele Carll is helping Mrs. Davis with her elocution classes in Ex- 
tension Teaching, beside keeping on with her regular work as teacher 
in Bryant High School. 

1905 

Prof. Emilie Hutchinson of our Economics Department has been 
awarded the Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Fellowship. She will 
study abroad next year the economic conditions of women in England 
and on the Continent, and will complete her book, now in preparation, 
concerning women in industry. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Louis Cowley (Anna Thorp), a daughter. 

Lydia Sparkman has married David Demarest Williams and is now 
living in Denver, Colorado. 


34 


1906 

Senta Herrmann has married Herman Bernhard. 

Julia Electra Ludlow Young died August 21, 1920, at Manila, P. I. 
At the time of her death Mrs. Young was instructor in stenography 
and typing at an Episcopal mission station in the Philippines. 

Marie Louise Fontaine has finished her work in the anti-tuberculosis 
campaign in France and is tutoring children of American Army officers 
in Coblenz. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph G Stoddard (Eleanor Holden), a 
daughter. 

1907 

Helen Harvitt is lectrice in English at the Sorbonne and also holds 
a fellowship there. She will return to America in the summer. 

Margaret Bailey, who is teaching in St. Mary’s Hall, Shanghai, China, 
will start her second furlough from the mission field at the close of the 
present school year. 

Anne Carroll is teaching Science in the Technical and Vocational 
High School at Newtonville, Mass. 

Leslie Gardiner is teacher of Domestic Science and dietitian in the 
South Orange High School. 

Beatrice Bernkoff is statistician for Smith & Kaufman, manufacturers 
of silk ribbons. 

Born to Dr. and Mrs. James J. Walsh (Julia H. Freed), a daughter, 
September 14, 1919 

1908 

Martha Hoermann died on July 18, 1920 at Colorado Springs. While 
she was teaching at Hunter College Miss Hoermann broke down in 
health and through a long illness never lost interest in her Alma Mater 
and the companions of her college days. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. William L. J. Duffy (Ellen O’Gorman), a son, 
Warren Duffy. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Van Nostrand (Maud Klein), a son. 
November 19. 1919. 

Clairette Armstrong is secretary to the chairman of the board of 
directors of the New York Trust Co. 

1909 

Mrs. Murray L. Stillman (Edna Thompkins, ex-’09) of Ramsay, N. Y., 
is the first woman to be chosen on the School Board and has also been 
elected Vice-President of the newly formed Parent-Teacher Association. 

Adelaide E. Smithers is teaching Spanish in the University of Illi- 
nois. 

Mary Demarest is attached to the Baptist Mission in Yang Chow, 
China. 

Antoinette Riordan is business manager of the Continental Guaranty 
Corporation. 

Sara Rome is conducting a shop for the sale of painted furniture at 
18 East 49th Street. 

1910 

Elizabeth Rawcliffe is teaching in the Greenwich Academy. 

Margaret Renton is secretary to Dr. Fosdick of Union Theological 
Seminary. 

Doris Long is executive secretary for the Rensselaer County Tuber- 
culosis Association. 

Ruth Hakes is secretary at the Collegiate School for Boys, New 
York City. 

Hazel Woodhull is physical director and dean of girls in the County 
High School, Elko, Nevada. 


35 


i 


Rosetta Platt has gone to Persia as a private tutor. 

Margery Eggleston has been elected to the executive staff of the 
Rockefeller Foundation. She is Assistant Secretary of the China Med- 
ical Board, a department of the Association, and will go to China this 
summer. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Molloy (Mabel McCann), a daughter. 
Harriet Ann, January 2, 1921. 

Margaret Mary O’Donnell died on March 12, 1921. During her 
college course she was a member of the Craigie and Classical Clubs 
and the Deutcher Kreis. After graduation she went into educational 
work and had been teaching in the public schools. 

1911 

Edna J. McKeever is Director of Investigation for Manhattan and 
the Bronx under the Board of Child Welfare. 

Lillian Schoedler, who is doing secretarial work and assisting with 
musical clubs at Hull House, Chicago, recently paid a visit to New 
York. 

Anna Martin, director of Department of Child Study in the Schools 
of Rochester, N. Y., has been awarded the Anna C. Brackett Memorial 
Fellowship for a year of study toward her Ph.D. in Psycholog}' and 
Education. 

Harriet Currier has married Park Elliott. 

Dr. Eugenia Ingennan has married Bela Low. 

Edith M. Morris has married William Young Duncan, Yale ’10. 

1912 

Philadelphia M. Sharp has married Harry G. Carpenter. 

Mildred Hodges is teaching French in the Morristown High School. 

Isabel Morrison has married C. Hazen Stevens. 

Gladys R. Segee has married William Cist. 

1913 

Dorothea Von Doenhoff is nutrition advisor in one of the new Red 
Cross health centres. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Anderson (Sarah Voorhis), Harris- 
burg, Pa., a daughter. Jean Spence, March 4, 1920. 

Claire Lingg returned home from Y. W. C. A. work in Poland on 
January 24. 

Ethel W. Webb has married Harold Underwood Faulkner. 

Anne C. Neacy has married Lathrop Finlayson. 

Margarita E. Leland has married Frank J. Leyerle. 

Margaret Kelley is research assistant to Dr Park, Bellevue Medical 
Laboratory. 

1914 

Eleanor Mayer Clark died on January 24, 1920. In her senior year 
Mrs. Clark was Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Under- 
graduate Association and took an active part in athletics during her 
college course. She married Asa Baldwin Clark in 1919. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hardy Hudson (Julia H, Pierpont), a 
daughter, Rose Elizabeth, December 23, 1919. 

Sophie Andrews has married Dr. Maurice I. Root. 

Mary E. Kenney has married Ray Rood Allen, Wesleyan and Har- 
vard Law. 

Luisa Ros has married John W. White and is now living in North 
Brookfield, Mass. 

Esther Hawes has finished some work for the Red Cross and gone 
to the National Board of the Y. W. C. A. 

Helen Bradbeer has an important position in the Consolidated Bud- 
get Division of Henry L. Doherty & Co. 

36 


Ethel Cherry is with the Civic Protective Association in New Haven, 
Conn. She was a delegate to the All-American Conference on Venereal 
Diseases recently held in Washington. 

Claudia Moritz has taken a position as writer of fashion advertise- 
ments for Gimbel’s. 

Louise Adams has been promoted to be Professor of Latin at Smith 
College. 

Alice Waller is in charge of the school department and book adver- 
tising for the C. J. Oliphant Advertising Co. 

Winifred Boegehold has accepted a position with the Rockefeller 
Foundation. 

1915 

Margaret Nathan Meyer has just accepted a position with the Social 
Secretariat which is to be conducted by Town and Country. 

Mary Gray has married Archie B. Gile. 

Ethel Hunley Johnston died on February 8, 1920. Through her col- 
lege course Mrs. Johnston was an active worker in the Christian Asso- 
ciation. She married Paul I. Johnston in 1916. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Allan Porterfield (Elsie Chesley), a son, on 
February 10, 1921. 

Charlotte W. Stobaugh has married Mr. Stableford. 

Helen Blumenthal has married Irving Valentine. 

Dorothy A. Krier has married Ramon Oscar Thelander. 

Alice Louise Jones has married James Granville Robertson. 

Elsie Oerzen is statistician for the Presiding Bishop and Council of 
the Episcopal Church. 

Lillian Soskin Rogers is research economist and statistician with 
Eugene Meyer, Jr. 

Alice Webber is in charge of the social work at the Augusta State 
Hospital, Augusta, Maine. 

1916 

Edith Carothers has taken her Ph.D. in Psychology at Columbia. 

Katherine W. McGiffert has married John Kirtland Wright. 

Kathryn Parker Trowbridge has married Paul McCormick. 

Edna Lonigan is statistician in the New York State Department of 
Labor. 

Daisy M. Appley has been appointed principal of the Mahopac High 
School for next year. 

1917 

Gulli Lindh Muller is graduating at the head of the class at the 
Columbia Medical School this year and has been appointed interne at 
the Presbyterian Hospital. 

Helen Callan died on February 28, 1921. After graduation Miss 
Callan went into educational work and had been teaching in the high 
school at Rumson, N. J. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Nutt Jr. (Ruth Wheeler), a daughter, 
Isabella French. 

Georgina Stickland has married Arthur I. Gates. 

Marion Stevens has announced her engagement to Arthur Allen 
Eberly, Dartmouth ’08. After her marriage Miss Stevens will live in 
Buenos Ayres. 

Marion Hayden has announced her engagement to Henry Latane 
Stevens. 

Ida Klausner has married Samuel Dubin. 

Agnes M. Kloss has married Murray Kirke Cadwell. 

Rose Ellis has married I. A. Shapiro. 

Elsa M. Becker is a scientific translator and laboratory assistant in 
the H. A. Metz Co. in Brooklyn. 

Babette Deutsch is making an anthology of Russian poetry. 


37 


Edna Pritchard has married William Glasgow Thompson. 

Geraldine Krause has married Alfred Kahn. 

Elinor Sachs will soon go to Holland for six months special service 
under the Council for Jewish Women, working with the large camps 
of immigrants who are waiting to come to the United States. 

Marguerite MacNair is in Los Angeles working as a mathematical 
assistant with an automobile firm. 

Grace Diercks has gone to the Library Bureau for secretarial work. 

Adelaide Bunker has married H. S. White. 

Julia Gottlieb is the assistant head of the correspondence department 
of Bonwit Teller. 

Lillian Schaeffer is bacteriologist at St. Mark’s Hospital, New York 
City. 

Gladys Palmer is assistant to the Purchasing Agent, Research Cor- 
poration. 

Katharine Quackenbos is working in the emergency department of the 
Guaranty Trust Company and hopes to be transferred to the foreign 
department soon. 

Ruth Benjamin is research assistant for the C. A. Nichols Publish- 
ing Co., working on topics of American History and Government. 

Eleanor Wilkens is editorial assistant for Women’s Wear. 

Hilda Rau is selling for the Angora Specialty Company. 

Dorothy F. Leet is acting as part-time secretary to Dean Robbins of 
the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. 

Sylvia Hecht is assistant in the employment and personnel work with 
R. H. Macy & Co. 

1918 

Esther Rogers has married Kioski Shiomi and is now living at Do- 
shiska University, Kioti, Japan. 

Margaret Snyder is a secretary in the advertising department of the 
Butterick Publishing Co. 

Carol Grimshaw Dupy is correspondent with Schweitzer Importers, 
Inc. 

Wendela Liander has married Albert Otto Friend. 

Gertrude Bergstrom has married Mark Leslie Thompson. 

Virginia Williams has married Delano Perrine Foote. 

May A. Levison is a statistical clerk with the Federal Reserve Bank. 

Viola Williams married Ronald Bruce Hotson on March 26. 

Louise Holloway has married Benjamin Eli. 

Dorothy Keck has married Gerald Haywood. 

Isabel Greenbaum was married to Jacob C. Stone on April 3. 

Frieda Kenyon is laboratory assistant in physics in the Bureau of 
Standards in Washington. 

Ruth Bunzel has taken a position as editorial assistant with the 
Theatre Magazine. 

Hedwig Koenig is assistant in microscopic work, United States Rub- 
ber Co. 

Adelina Longaker is a reporter and feature worker for the Mil- 
waukee Journal. 

Helen Purdy has a scholarship at the University of Copenhagen. 

Olivia Cauldwell is with the C. H. 'Young Publishing Co. as assistant 
editor of Breezy Stories. 

Irma Liccione and Lillian Weygandt are teaching in the Italian 
School under the Children’s Aid Society in this city. 

Erica Willrich is studying at the Sorbonne, Paris. 

Dorothy Graffe is acting as secretary to Oswald Villard in connec- 
tion with his work for the Manassas Industrial School. 

1919 

Gertrude Geer is teaching in Mrs. Randall Maclver’s classes. 

38 


Lucretia Peters is teaching Civics at Packer Collegiate Institute. 

Helen Wallace is Membership Secretary of the Central Branch of the 
Y. W. C. A. 

Myra Kohnstamm has a position as Assistant Supervisor in the 
Juvenile Placement Department of the New York State Labor Bureau 
as assistant to Margaret Carr ’15. 

Susan Gower is teaching Chemistry and Mathematics in the Girls’ 
Collegiate School in Richmond, Va. 

Blanche Stroock has announced her engagement to S. Schwartzchild, 
of Richmond, Va. 

Alice Goebell is Director of Instruction in the Bristol, Conn., plant 
of the National India Rubber Co. 

Helen N. White has married F. W. Ash. 

Margaret Armitage Ogden has married Arthur James Markham. 

Margaret Terribery has married Mr. Hoyt. 

Josephine M. Powell has married John Owen Beatty. 

Mvrrha Wesendonck has been seeing the West doing apple picking 
in Washington, sales girl and lunch counter work in San Francisco, 
and is now hoping for summer work in the Yosemite. 

Ernestine Lind is with the New York State Association as secretary. 

Ruth Lewv has married Frederic Victor Guinzburg. 

Gretchen Torek — ex-1919, is correspondent with Schweitzer Import- 
ers, Inc. 

Theodora Skinner has married Frank Lyon Barnwell. 

Vivian Tappan has been appointed for next year teacher of physics 
in the Brearlev School. 

Anna Weil Mendes is a correspondent with Schweitzer, Importers. 

1920 

Alice Barrington is assistant to the managing editor of the Credit 
Monthly. 

Maude Lane is in the City Clerk’s office in Springfield. Mass. 

Margaret Nolan and Margaret Costello are teaching in the Ursuline 
Academy in the Bronx. 

Mary Scott and Margaret Crawley have scholarships for study in 
France. 

Helen Hicks is supervisor of the training of juniors in the depart- 
ment store of Bamberger & Co., Newark. 

Gertrude Rissmeyer is working in the laboratories of the State De- 
partment of Health at Bellevue. 

Lucile Marsh is teaching ' spoken English at Smith College. 

Juliete Mevlan is teaching at Foxwood School in Flushing. 

Margaret Rawson is assistant in personnel work at McCreery’s, teach- 
ing store system to new employees and doing follow-up work on the 
floor. 

Paule More and Jean Brown are tutoring. 

Pauline Manley is doing library research for the Amarada Petroleum 
Corporation. 

Amy Harris is teaching English in St. Mary’s College, Dallas, Texas. 

Lucy Rafter, Dorothy Robb, Marie Uhrbrock, Louise Cox and Evelyn 
Baldwin are doing mathematical work for the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. 

Grace Kerr is secretary and research assistant in Econdmics for Mr. 
Anderson of the Chase National Bank. 

Julia Lesser has a position in the Labor and Service Department of 
the Westinghouse Lamp Co. in Bloomfield, N. J. 

Dorothea Lemcke and Gertrude Rissmeyer are laboratory assistants 
in the City Health Department. 

Louisa Eyre is assistant in Physics in the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 


39 


Felice Jarecky and Ethel Kossmann are editorial assistants in the 
Nicholas Publishing Co. 

Ethel McLean is library assistant at Columbia. 

Eleanor Curry has married Samuel H. Parkins. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Howard L. Auerbach (Alice Buchman), on De- 
cember 22, 1920, a son, Peter B. 

Edna Colucci is junior statistician with the New York State Public 
Service Commission. 

Helen Krigsman is doing some research work in municipal problems 
for the American City Bureau. 

Sophie Koerner has married Dr. Bernard Gottlieb. 

Elizabeth Rabe has just taken a position as secretary with M. H. 
Avram, industrial engineers. 

Bertha Wallerstein is teaching school in England. 

Ruth Steward has announced her engagement to James Gibson Ewell. 

1921 

Marriage — Gertrude Bendheim on February 27 to Mr. Allan Strauss. 
Claire Schenck has gone to the American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
as clerk. 

Grace Sinnigen has been appointed teacher of Latin in the Peck. 
School in Morristown, N. J. 

Dorothe Reichhard is assistant statistical editor of the Electrical 
World, with the McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. 


CLASS OF 1920 


Armstrong, Elizabeth Howard 
Ashley, Helen Carolyn 
Auerbach, (Mrs.) Howard L., 


Evelyn, Mary Baldwin 
Barrington, Alice Livingston 
Barrington, Marjory Livingston 
Barry, Corinne Alice 
Barten, Hortense Marguerite 
Barton, Helen Carolyn 
Benton, Pauline 
Bien, Esther Rudolph 
Borden, Alice Joyce 
Borst, Helen 

Sostwick, Winifred Francis 
Boucher, Marguerite Allen 
Breaker, Helen 
Brill, Bessie Lucille 
Brown, Jean Elizabeth 
Brubaker, Ruth 
Burne, Dorothy 
Butler, Dorothy 
Calhoun. Helena Billard 
Carbonara, Teresa Adelaide 
Chalmers, Ruth Deborah 
Chase, Jane Kerr 
Clarke. Helen St. John 
Colucci, Edna Caroline 
Costello, Margaret C. 

Cox, Mary Louise 
Crandall, Lola Marion 
Crowley, Margaret Phoebe 


32 East 61st St., New York 
346 Lexington Ave., New York 
Ridgeway, Gedney Farms, 

White Plains, N. Y. 
20 Bridge St., Hackensack. N. J. 
3089 Broadway, New York 
3089 Broadway, New York 
415 West 120th St., New York 
1678 First Ave., New York 
431 West 121st St., New York- 
440 Riverside Drive, New York 
243 West 98th St., New York 
182 West 58th St., New York 
91 Maurice Ave., Elmhurst, L. I. 

612 West 1 1 5th St., New York 
.165 Madison St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
570 First St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
418 Central Park West, New York 
307 West 98th St., New York 
Mountain View, N. J 
Huntington, L. I 
14 Locust Hill Ave., Yonkers, N. Y 
247 Division Ave., Hasbrouck Hts., N. J 
169-a LTtica Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y 
2654 Marion Ave., New York 
Spring Brook, Wis 
52 Larch Ave., Bogota, N. J 
512 Classon Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y 
Behrens Pk., Irvington-on-Hudson, N. Y 
36 Grove St., Cranford, N. J 
.Fulton, N. Y 
9 Greenleaf Circle, Lynn, Mass 


40 


259 St. 


Cupp, Katharine Lucille 
Curry, Eleanor May 
Douglas, Jean 
Everson, Ida Gertrude 
Eyre, Louisa Lear 
Fishberg, Ella Harriet 
Fontaine, Elise de la 
Friedman, Lillian Cecile 
Garfiel, Evelyn 
Garner, Mary Elizabeth 
Garritson, Mary Louise 
Goforth, Frances Willard 
Gottheil, Eleanor 
Gruggel, Christine Ingeborg 
Harris, Amy Theodora 
Harris, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Harris, Ethel 
Herod, Margaret Nola 
Hobe, Elizabeth Barbara 
Hopkins, Anne McHenry 
Jareckv, Felice Helen 
Jennings, Amy Sidney 
Jentz, Veronica Dorothy 
Johnston, Anne M. 

Kaufmann, Marion Sophie 
Keehn, Harriet 
Kennard, Elaine Muriel 
Kerr, Grace Mayfred 
Kidd, Frances Lillian 
Koerner, Sophie 
Kopald, Sylvia Beatrice 
Kossman, Ethel Adelaide 
Krigsman, Helen Emma 
Landauer, Tekki Picard 
Lane, Maud Lillian 
Leding, Aline Martha 
Lemcke, Ilse Dorothea 
Leslie, Agnes Jamison 
Lesser, Julia 
Levi, Marion Ella 
Lockhart, Marjorie Lee 
Maas, Agnes K. 

MacDonald, Josephine 
Macfarlane, Jean Knox 
Mack, Beatrice 
McKenzie, Janet 
McLean, Ethel Catherine 
MacMahon, Aline Laveen 
McNab, Margaret Helen 
Magoon, Alma Mae 
Mahneke, Pauline Clara Matilda 
Marsb, Agnes Lewis 
Marsh, Lucile 
Meissner, Elsa 

Mcixell, Louise Granville Henry 
Meylan, Louise Juliette 
Mochrie, Margaret Eickelberg 
More, Paule Henriette 
Myers, Margaret Good 
Nicolson, Margaret Erskine 


Junction City, Ark. 
115 Prospect St., Staunton, Va. 
21 East 8th St., Atlanta, Ga. 
Marks Place, New Brighton, S. I. 
138 East 36th St., New York 
170 West 59th St., New York 
140 West 69th St., New York 
172 Sterling Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
20 East 90th St., New York 
Wantagh, Long Island 
2400 Broadway, Logansport, Ind. 

Lenoir, N. C. 
148 West 75th St., New York 
29th St. and 16th Ave., Whitestone, N. Y. 
148 Beekman Rd., Summit, N. J. 

Arden, N. C. 
1165 14th Ave. W., Vancouver, B. C. 
126 Claremont Ave., New York 
110 Morningside Drive, New York 
304 E. Gaston St., Savannah, Ga. 
138 West 86th St., New York 
44 East 80th St., New York 
92 Sherman Place, Jersey City, N. J. 
1719 Fifth Ave., Council Bluffs, Iowa 
316 West 101st St., New York 
11 North York St., Paterson, N. J. 
40 Benedict Ave., Tarrytown, N. J. 
87 Main Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 
455 Ft. Washington Ave., New York 
601 West 137th St., New York 
629 Gates Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
220 Cathedral Parkway, New York 
272 West 90th St., New York 
62 West. State St., Albion, N. Y. 
154 Alden St., Springfield, Mass. 
59 Union St., Ridgewood, N. J. 
14 Van Nest Place, New York 
503 West 121st St., New York 
795 St. Nicholas Ave., New York 
18 West 88th St., New York 
209 Claremont Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

130 East 72nd St., New York 
169 West 76th St., New York 
Salem Center, N. Y. 
318 West 100th St., New York 
1127 West St, Utica, N. Y. 
445 West 21st St., New York 
70 Morningside Drive, New York 
2119 McKinney Ave., Dallas, Texas 
66 Prospect St., Manchester, N. H. 
33 N. Washington PL, Astoria, L. I. 
844 Colorado Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
844 Colorado Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
315 Oak St., West Hoboken, N. J. 
540 West 122nd St., New York 
468 West 141st St., New York 
21 Ash St., Flushing, L. I. 
834 Sterling Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
183 N. Parkway, East Orange, N. J. 

Oradell, N. J. 


41 


Nolan, Margaret Anne 
O’Brien, Marion 
Oldenbusch, Carolyn 
Omeis, Marie Louise Florida 
Opdycke, Mary Ellis 
Piel, Agnes 
Piersall, Catherine Elizabeth 
Pope, Regina 
Rabe, Elizabeth Valerie 
Rafter, Lucy 
Raynor, Amy Tuttle 
Ressmeyer, Gertrude Elenrietta 
Reynolds, Luda 
Robb, Dorothy Adele 
Robb, Janet Henderson 
Rosenberg, Marion Yosta 
Rothschild, Louise Theresa 
Russell, Frances Olivia 
Scancarello, Concettina Jeannette 
Schaeffer, Florence Louise 
Schwartz, Esther 
Seidman, Helen May 
Sexton, Caroline Graham 
Shafer, Katherine Armstrong 
Silbert, Dorothy 
Silver, Edith 
Simons, Bessie Ruth 
Small, Delphine 
Smith, Genevieve Marie 
Smith, Kathryn Lindsley 


Sternberg, Lillian 
Sutton, Mary Elizabeth 
Tewes, Mathilde Clara 
Thomas, Grace Elizabeth 
Torek, Gretchen Irma 
Touroff, Lillian Eleanor 
Travis, Marion 
Tye, Ethel 
Tyndall, Marion 
Uhrbrock, Marie Elise 
Vernon, Lucile 
Wallerstein, Bertha 
Walser, Violet Elvira 
Weil, Dorothy Pize 
White, Clarissa Dodge 
Whyte, Beatrice Methven 
Widrevitz, Laura 
Wilkens, Margaret Hermine 
Wood, Lois Morgan 
Wood, Mabel Travis 
Brosnan, Katharine Therese 
Fine, Estelle 
Hicks, Helen 
Himmelberger, Kathryn 
Mitchell, Ethel 
Rawson, Margaret 
Scott, Mary Emma 


204 West 78th St., New York 
191 Brighton Ave., Perth Amboy, N. J. 

72 Marlboro Rd., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
2884 Valentine Ave., Bedford Pk., N. Y. 

117 East 69th St., New York. 

Lawrence, L. I. 
109 S. 3rd Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

20 Crane St., Caldwell, N. J. 
348 East 23rd St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Port Washington, L. I. 

Islip, L. I. 
348 W. 122nd St., New 'York 
Arcadia, La. 
482 Greene Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
35 East 64th St., New York 
57 East 77th St., New York 
823 West End Ave., New York 
705 Prince St., Brunswick, Ga 
104J-2 Amity St., Flushing, L. I 
146 Hutton St., Jersey City, N. J 
151 Central Park West, New York 
580 High St., Newark, N. J 
172 Cleveland St., Orange, N. J 
2929 Prytania Ave., New Orleans, La 
954 West 7th St., Plainfield, N. J 
149 Prospect Park S. W., Brooklyn, N. Y, 
350 West 88th St., New York 
Germantown, Ohio, R. F. D. 4 
277 Canister St., Hornell, N. Y. 
c/o Mrs. T. C. Gower, Greenville, S. C., 

Box 985 

13 East 94th St., New York 
149 Clinton Ave., Jersey City, N. J 
511 Broadway, Astoria, L. I 
5800 Darlington Rd., Pittsburgh, Pa 
1021 Madison Ave., New York 
1828 Topping Ave., Bronx, N. Y 
29 West 12th St., New York 
740 Peachtree St., Atlanta, Ga 
201 S. Clinton St., East Orange, N. J 
379 Sterling Place, Brooklyn, N. Y 
604 E. 13th St., Bonham, Texas 
334 Highland Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
296 Sterling Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
736 West End Ave., New York 
408 Eighth Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y 
14 Benedict Ave., Tarrytown, N. Y 
2151 Walton Ave., New York 
284 Alexander Ave., New York 
478 State St. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
2 S. Broadway, Tarrvtown, N. Y. 
501 West 169th St., New York 
200 West 111th St., New York 
227 Roseville Ave., Newark, N. J. 
60 Linden Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 
712 Green St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Box 214. R.F.D. 1, Asbury Park, N. J. 
Lycee de Jeunes Filles, Caen, France 


42 


DON’T MISS THE COMMENCEMENT REUNION, 
JUNE 1, 1921 


“SOMETHING DOING EVERY HOUR” 


1:00 P.M. 
3:30 P.M. 

4:30 P.M. 

6:00 P.M. 
8:00 P.M. 


Trustees’ Luncheon to the Alumnae in the 
Gymnasium 

Class of 1914 will entertain the Alumnae in 
Brinkerhoff Theatre with a one act play “P’s 
and Q’s” by Annie Nathan Meyer 

Class of 1916 will entertain the Alumnae at tea 
on the North Terrace 

Class Suppers 

Class of 1911 will entertain the Alumnae in 
Brinkerhoff Theatre with two one act plays 

by the “Roundabout Players” 


Tickets required for the Class Suppers only. 



IVTcAlpin courtesy has set 
^ apart the entire sixth 
floor for unescorted women 
guests. There they will find 
a separate drawing room, 
well stocked library, hair 
dressing parlor, seamstress 
service and competent ladies’ 
maids. 


Mrs. Lois Pierce-Hughes, 
Hostess and Clubwoman 
in charge. 


The NewYork Trust Company 

with which is consolidated 


The Liberty National Bank 

of New York 


Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits - $26,000,000 


Liberty Office 
i 20 Broadway 


Main Office 
26 Broad Street 

Fifth Avenue Office 
57th St. & Fifth, Ave. 


nPHE Company offers complete facilities for the transaction of all 
-*■ banking and trust business at each of its offices. 

The Fifth Avenue Office is conveniently located in the heart of the 
Uptown Shopping District. At this office we should be glad to carry 
your personal or household checking account. 

Boxes in our modern safe deposit vaujts are available at moderate 
rentals. 

Special rooms for committee meetings and conferences are at the dis- 
posal of customers of this office. 


OFFICERS 

Otto T. Bannard 
Chairman of the Advisory Committee 

Mortimer N. Buckner 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees 

Harvey D. Gibson 
President 


Otto T. Bannard 
Mortimer N. Buckner 
Thomas Cochran 
James C. Colgate 
Alfred A. Cook 
Arthur J. Cumnock 
Otis H. Cutler 
Henry P. Davison 
Robert W. de Forest 
George Doubleday 


TRUSTEES 

Russell H. Dunham 
Samuel H. Fisher 
John A. Garver 
Harvey D. Gibson 
Thomas A. Gillespie 
Charles Hayden 
Lyman N. Hine 
F. N. Hoffstot 
Walter Jennings 


Darwin P. Kincsley 
Edward E. Loomis 
Howard W. Maxwell 
Ocden L. Mills 
Edward S. Moore 
Junius S. Morcan, Jr. 
Grayson M.-P. Murphy 
Henry C. Phipps 
Charles W. Riecks 
Dean Sage 


Member Federal Reserve System and New York Clearing House Association 


Starting the Day Right 

The first thing one wants in the morning is the newspaper. 

Take THE TRIBUNE, for instance : 

To read the first pages is to know what the world and his wife are doing. 

Then a few minutes spent on the editorial page to see what the reactions are to events 
of the day. And while you are on this page don’t forget to look at Ding’s cartoon— it 
would take pages to put in writing what Ding gets in any one of his cartoons. 

Also on this page, three mornings a week, Heywood Broun writes in his own original 
way about the latest books. And Broun’s dramatic criticisms are as closely followed 
by the theatrical profession as they are by those of us who want to know about the 
latest shows. 

Opposite the editorial page will be found every morning, a page devoted largely to 
society and the arts. 

/ . 

Following this page are two pages devoted to sporting news. Briggs with his human 
interest cartoons and Grantland Rice with his column on sports — largely devoted to 
golf and kindred sports — are the headliners on these pages. Besides Rice’s column you 
will find full reports of golf tournaments and tennis matches and the other country club 
sports as well as full account of the other sports. 

The Tribune’s financial pages will be found of particular interest to the laymen as the 
financial news is written in an easily understandable manner and the stock and bond 
tables are the most complete published in any generally circulated newspaper. 

After the business and real estate pages there comes the Tribune Shipping and Travel 
Guide. In this Guide will be found listed practically all the passenger lines operating 
out of American ports. Supplementing this is full information about the mails, arrival 
of passenger steamers and other marine news. 

The last page of the Tribune will be found of particular interest. It is devoted largely 
to human interest stories and since, in addition, the Thornton W. Burgess Bedtime 
Stories appear every morning, the children are always interested in this page. 

No modern newspaper is complete without advertising. In 1920 the Tribune carried 
the second greatest volume of department store advertising on weekdays among all 
New York morning newspapers. 

To have the New York Tribune with your breakfast 
coffee every morning is to START THE DAY RIGHT. 

Mew Dark <Eri(mne 


We DRAMA SCHOOL gf 
We 

SUN INSTITUTE OF ART, STUDY 
cAND PLAY 

Creative Development for All Walks of Life 

VOICE CULTURE, We DANCE, STAGE TECHNIQUE 
PRODUCTION gf PLAYS 

Evening Classes Fall Term opens September 19, 1921 

Visit, telephone or write 

S. MILDRED STRAUSS 

Telephone -j ^huyler 8128 473 WEST End AVENUE 


To the Friends of 
France 

Trencb-JImerican Committee Tor 
Open-Air Schools, (Inc.) 

“Les Amis de V Enfant” 

IN AMERICA 

Hon. Pres., Charles W. Eliot 
Pres., John R. Finley 
Vice-Pres., Mrs Robert Goelet 
Treas., H. L. Wilson 
Depository, Bankers' Trust Co. 

Secretary, Miss Irene M. Cornwell, 

105 West 40th Street, New York 

IN FRANCE 

Hon. Pres., Leon Bourgeois 
Chairman, Ferdinand Buisson 
Dr. Albert Calmette, Director Pasteur 
Institute 

M. Lapie, Director of Primary Education 

The most pressing problem of social 
reconstruction in France to-day is the 
physical reconstruction of the children. 
A model open-air school is to be built 
at Lille. 


This space contributed 
by 

A Friend of 
The Pi Beta Phi 
Settlement School 
Gatlingburg, Tenn. 


; 



EAQLE niKADO PENCIL 


COVERING ALL REQUIREMENTS 


EAGLE PENCIL COMPANY, NEW YORK 


BED BAND 


THE LEADING PENCIL-MADE 
BY THE LARGEST PENCIL 
MANUFACTURER IN 
THE WORLD 

THE 

YELLOW PENCIL 

WITH THE 


MADE 
IN FIVE 
ACCURATE 
GRADES 

No. 1 Soft 

No. 2 Medium 

No. 2i Medium Hard 

No. 3 Hard 

No. 4 Very Hard 


The 

HAdiOUM CAMVS 

for GI^LS 

THETFORD - VERMONT 

Conducted, by 
Professor and Mrs. 

Charles Hubert Farnsworth 
of Teachers College, Columbia University, New York 

Illustrated booklet on request 

THIRTEENTH SEASON 

1921 


:□ 



ALICE KAUSER 

Dramatist’s Agent — Plays 

Established 1895 

MOTION PICTURE DEPARTMENT 

R. L. Giffen, Associate Mgr. 

1402 Broadway New York 


LEXINGTON 

AVE. 

AT aS’-'ST. 

/ FOR MORE THAN 
'A QUARTER Or A 
'CENTURY WE HAVE 
'BEEN PREPARING 

— 'accountants, 

^w/5'' secretaries.cashiers, 

p STENOGRAPHERS , TYPISTS, 
n SALES clerks, and office WORKERS. 

_ A DISTINCTLY SPECIAL SCHOOL 

HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE GRADES 

CATALOGUE FREE 



NEW YORK 


A school that has been send- 
ing men and women into business 
for 26 years knows how. 

Special intensive courses for 
college graduates. 


Manuscripts 

Wanted 


There are certain kinds of 
book manuscripts — and they 
may be by new authors — that 
are likely to interest us. 
Perhaps you would like to 
send us yours. But let us 
say in advance that we do 
not publish books at the 
author’s expense. 


The 


Penn Publishing Co. 

925 Filbert St. - Philadelphia 


P’s and Q’s 

THE SHOP OF A 
THOUSAND PLAYS 

A Farce-Comedy in One Act 
by 

ANNIE NATHAN MEYER 

Excellent for amateurs. 2 males, 

2 females. Plays thirty minutes. 
Crisp dialogue and delicious fun. 

Daniel Frohman says: “Charming and 
effective ... an entirely novel subject 
for the stage. ” 

<A Unique Book Shop Devoted Ex- 
clusively to C PLA YS and BOOKS 
Pertaining to the DRAMA and the 
THEATRE 

Books for the PLAY READER, the 
PLAYGOER, the PLAY WRITER 
and the PLAY PRODUCER : : : 

Learn the joy of reading plays, as well as 
seeing them 

SAMUEL FRENCH 

Publisher 

28 West 38th Street 

New York 

& 

THE DRAMA BOOK SHOP 

Conducted by 

The New York Drama League 

Or, order through your own book shop. 
Price 30c. 

29 West 47th Street Ne<w York City 

Room 408 


WE OFFER YOU 
KNOWLEDGE, NOT HEARSAY 

I N buying Floor Coverings, Furniture, and Decorative Fabrics, one 
should remember that stores operating solely as clearing houses can 
have but a superficial knowledge of the goods they sell. 

Sloane’s, on the other hand, are identified with the actual production of 
a great proportion of their own stocks, and possess that true sense of 
values which proceeds from first-hand knowledge rather than from 
second-hand information. 

This also enables us, in selecting merchandise from other sources than 
our own, to pronounce judgment instead of having to solicit it. 

W. C& J. SLOANE 

FLOOR COVERINGS FABRICS FURNITURE 

FIFTH AVENUE at 47th STREET, NEW YORK 

WASHINGTON, D. C. :: :: :: SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.